ICS Magazine

Stat Tracking and Goal Setting

May 1, 2012
Within the operations of a successful carpet cleaning business is a manager tracking statistics and setting goals. It is vital to have a finger on the pulse of the operations to know whether the company is living or dying.



Within the operations of a successful carpet cleaning business is a manager tracking statistics and setting goals. It is vital to have a finger on the pulse of the operations to know whether the company is living or dying. These statistics can then be compared, year after year, to see how the company stacks up against itself. There are a few key statistics, aside from overall revenue, that are common within the carpet cleaning service.

One statistic to look at is sell-ups or added value services. The sell-up can be looked at from different perspectives. It isn’t just about how much you sold up in a day. It is also about what the average is for you or your technicians per job. Or also, how much did you sell compared to the overall total? Do you usually sell-up in the 10% range of what was originally ordered? Or is it more like 40%? These stats can determine if you or your technicians are presenting the additional products and services in an effective manner or whether they need further sales training.

If you don’t track your re-services then you should. What is the percentage of re-services performed compared to all the jobs you performed? If you have to go back to only two or three jobs for every 100, then you are probably doing pretty well. Use this stat to create goals for your next month or year. I recommend comparing the same month from year to year.

How many customers call with great comments or to request you or your technicians? Start a spreadsheet documenting these calls so that you can track them. Knowing who is exceeding customer expectations and gaining requests will help you build upon this trend. Find out from the technician that is performing well what it is that he/she is doing to gain these calls and use this information to build consistency amongst the rest.

As an operations manager, I find that these are some of my favorite stats to look at and research. I can use these to find strengths and weaknesses within the team to either praise or correct them. I then use the stats to compare year-to-year and set goals for the team.